Prevalence and related factors of needle-sharing behavior among female prisoners

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

10 引文 (Scopus)

摘要

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and factors related to needle-sharing behavior among intravenous heroin users in female prisons in Taiwan. Methods: Study participants (n=438) were recruited from 3 female prisons in 2002. Participants were told the goals and objectives of the study, and were then asked to indicate their willingness to participate by signing consent forms. A self-administered questionnaire included three parts: personal characteristics, knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and drug-related behaviors. Results: A large percentage of subjects had knowledge about modes of HIV transmission. Of 438 female heroin offenders, 40 reported that they had never injected heroin. Of 398 intravenous heroin users, 75.1% had shared needles, 54.8% had shared needles within the last month before incarceration, and 27.1% reported that they had shared a needle during their most recent heroin use. Participants who were of a younger age at the time of their first heroin use were much more likely to have shared needles. Marital status and being tested for HIV were significant predictors of sharing a needle during their most recent heroin use. Conclusions: There is a gap between knowledge of the risk of needle sharing and the needle-sharing behavior reported by study subjects. Hence, effective HIV prevention programs must identify strategies for reducing needle-sharing behavior among female intravenous heroin users.

原文英語
頁(從 - 到)27-31
頁數5
期刊Journal of Medical Sciences
25
發行號1
出版狀態已發佈 - 2005 二月 1

指紋

Needle Sharing
Prisoners
Heroin
Needles
HIV
Prisons
Consent Forms
Anti-HIV Agents
Marital Status
Taiwan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

引用此文

Prevalence and related factors of needle-sharing behavior among female prisoners. / Lee, Tony Szu Hsien.

於: Journal of Medical Sciences, 卷 25, 編號 1, 01.02.2005, p. 27-31.

研究成果: 雜誌貢獻文章

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abstract = "Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and factors related to needle-sharing behavior among intravenous heroin users in female prisons in Taiwan. Methods: Study participants (n=438) were recruited from 3 female prisons in 2002. Participants were told the goals and objectives of the study, and were then asked to indicate their willingness to participate by signing consent forms. A self-administered questionnaire included three parts: personal characteristics, knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and drug-related behaviors. Results: A large percentage of subjects had knowledge about modes of HIV transmission. Of 438 female heroin offenders, 40 reported that they had never injected heroin. Of 398 intravenous heroin users, 75.1{\%} had shared needles, 54.8{\%} had shared needles within the last month before incarceration, and 27.1{\%} reported that they had shared a needle during their most recent heroin use. Participants who were of a younger age at the time of their first heroin use were much more likely to have shared needles. Marital status and being tested for HIV were significant predictors of sharing a needle during their most recent heroin use. Conclusions: There is a gap between knowledge of the risk of needle sharing and the needle-sharing behavior reported by study subjects. Hence, effective HIV prevention programs must identify strategies for reducing needle-sharing behavior among female intravenous heroin users.",
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