Using mobile applications for learning: Effects of simulation design, visual-motor integration, and spatial ability on high school students’ conceptual understanding

June Yi Wang, Hsin Kai Wu, Ying Shao Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of simulation design, visual-motor integration, and spatial ability on students’ conceptual understandings of projectile motion and collision. We developed three simulations including two mobile applications (app) and a computer simulation. One app (TA) employed the multi-touch feature for virtual manipulation, the other (TAG) implemented the multi-touch and tilt features, while the computer simulation (CS) was performed using a mouse. 211 10th graders were assigned to the three simulation groups. The results indicated that on the items of basic concepts, the CS and TA groups performed significantly better than the TAG group, whereas for the advanced concepts, the TA and TAG groups scored significantly higher than the CS group. Also, high visual-motor integration students did significantly better on the advanced concepts than low visual-motor integration students. Additionally, the interaction effect between simulation design and spatial ability showed that the two apps had a similar effect on students with different levels of spatial ability. The results suggest that mobile apps could narrow the performance gap between students with different levels of spatial ability, but effective interactions with the multi-touch interface of apps may require new skills such as visual-motor integration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-113
Number of pages11
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume66
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Mobile Applications
Computer Simulation
Learning
Students
Touch
Application programs
Computer simulation
Projectiles
Interfaces (computer)
Spatial Navigation
Simulation
High School Students
Visual Design
Spatial Ability
Interaction

Keywords

  • Computer simulation
  • Conceptual understanding
  • Mobile apps
  • Physics learning
  • Spatial ability
  • Visual-motor integration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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