University students’ profiles of online learning and their relation to online metacognitive regulation and internet-specific epistemic justification

Theerapong Binali, Chin Chung Tsai, Hsin Yi Chang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined university students’ online learning profiles in terms of activities, purposes, and engagement, and how the different profiles related to metacognitive regulation and internet-specific epistemic justification. Three questionnaires were used to collect data from 389 undergraduate and graduate students in Thailand. The results indicated five emergent clusters as follows: highly-engaged self-driven online contributors, moderately engaged self-driven online viewers, less engaged self-driven online learners, highly engaged course-driven online learners, and less engaged course-driven online learners. Moreover, the students of the five clusters who demonstrated different online learning profiles showed significant differences in their metacognitive regulation and internet-specific epistemic justification. Implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104315
JournalComputers and Education
Volume175
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

Keywords

  • Internet-specific epistemic belief
  • Metacognitive regulation
  • Online learning profiles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Computer Science
  • Education

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