The importance of gender and affect in the socialization of adolescents' beliefs about benevolent authority: Evidence from Chinese indigenous psychology

James Hou Fu Liu, Kuang Hui Yeh*, Chih Wen Wu, Li Liu, Yiyin Yang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Belief in the benevolence and moral legitimacy of leaders in central government is theorized as a form of cultural capital consistent with the hierarchical relationalism of East Asian societies with Confucian roots. A reliable measure of benevolent authority beliefs (BAB) is introduced, and its convergent and discriminant validity relative to established measures of institutional trust are established. Its socialization as part of the political culture of Taiwan was examined among high school adolescents aged 13-16. Significant gender differences were found inconsistent with traditional patriarchy. Regression analyses showed that within the relationship with mothers but not fathers, adolescents associated higher reciprocal filial piety, authoritative parenting, and authentic (positive) affect with higher BAB. For daughters but not sons, reciprocal filial piety, authoritative parenting style, and authentic (positive) affect in the relationship with their father were positively associated with BAB. Affect-based transfer from parent-child relationships rather than authoritarian obligations based on rote learning was a key socializing factor in a contemporary Chinese society.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-114
Number of pages14
JournalAsian Journal of Social Psychology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jun 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Benevolent authority beliefs
  • Filial piety
  • High power distance cultures
  • Parent-child relationships
  • Political socialization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Social Sciences(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The importance of gender and affect in the socialization of adolescents' beliefs about benevolent authority: Evidence from Chinese indigenous psychology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this