The effects of goal specificity and scaffolding on programming performance and self-regulation in game design

Chia Yen Feng, Ming-Puu Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of goal specificity and scaffolding on the programming performance and self-regulation of elementary students engaged in learning game design. This study recruited 232 students for the experimental activities. Two levels of goal specificity were employed: specific and nonspecific. Structuring and problematizing scaffolds were also used to support students in the process of learning. Our results reveal the following: (1) nonspecific goals and structuring scaffolds led to superior comprehension of programming, (2) nonspecific goals with problematizing scaffolds led to better problem-solving performance, (3) problematizing scaffolds were more effective than structuring scaffolds in the development of self-regulation behavior, and (4) nonspecific goals were more effective than specific goals in the promotion of resource management associated with self-regulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-302
Number of pages18
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Technology
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Mar 1

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self-regulation
programming
performance
student
learning
comprehension
promotion
management
resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

The effects of goal specificity and scaffolding on programming performance and self-regulation in game design. / Feng, Chia Yen; Chen, Ming-Puu.

In: British Journal of Educational Technology, Vol. 45, No. 2, 01.03.2014, p. 285-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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