The cognitive-linguistic profiles and academic performances of Chinese children with dyslexia across cultures: Beijing, Hong Kong, and Taipei

Dora Jue Pan, Xiangzhi Meng*, Jun Ren Lee, Melody Chi Yi Ng, Catherine McBride*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the cognitive-linguistic and literacy-related correlates of dyslexia in three Chinese cities and the English word reading and mathematics performances of Chinese children with dyslexia. Chinese children with/without dyslexia were measured with an equivalent test battery of literacy and mathematics in Beijing, Hong Kong, and Taipei. Univariate analysis results suggested that phonological sensitivity distinguished those with and without dyslexia across all three cities in group comparisons. In Taipei and Hong Kong, morphological awareness, delayed copying, and spelling also distinguished the groups. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that Chinese character reading, as directly compared to Chinese word reading, also distinguished the groups particularly well. In addition, in Beijing and Hong Kong, children with dyslexia performed significantly less well in English word reading than those without dyslexia. In Hong Kong and Taipei, children with dyslexia also had difficulties in mathematics performance. Findings highlight the fundamental importance of some cognitive-linguistic skills for explaining Chinese dyslexia across cultures, the utility of recognizing the individual Chinese character as a foundational unit of analysis in Chinese across cultures, and the generalizability of the comorbidity of both English as a second language (L2) and mathematics with dyslexia in Chinese children in both Beijing and Hong Kong.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Dyslexia
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • Academic performance
  • Chinese children
  • Cognitive-linguistic skills
  • Cultural differences
  • Dyslexia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Speech and Hearing

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The cognitive-linguistic profiles and academic performances of Chinese children with dyslexia across cultures: Beijing, Hong Kong, and Taipei'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this