The climatological analysis of typhoon tracks, steering flow, and the pacific subtropical high in the vicinity of Taiwan and the Western North Pacific

Chih Wen Hung*, Ming Fu Shih, Te Yuan Lin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taiwan frequently suffers from typhoon hits in the boreal summer and fall. The location of Taiwan makes it vulnerable to the pathways of typhoons mainly determined by the position of the Pacific subtropical high. In order to clarify the linkage between typhoon invasion and associated large-scale environments from a climatological perspective, this study counts the historical typhoon invasion days for each month in the typhoon season to establish analyzed cases and then categorizes them with statistical thresholds. Besides, the categorized cases with less typhoon invasion are further sorted to distinguish different movements of tropical cyclones. Therefore, corresponding composites are applied for each category. The results reveal that when the subtropical high retreats eastward, the accompanying steering flow guides typhoons to make an early recurvature toward Japan and South Korea. While the subtropical high further extends its property to the west covering Taiwan, the steering flow on the south transfers typhoons moving westward to the South China Sea. However, when the subtropical high lies in areas between the above two scenarios, the steering flow along the periphery of the subtropical high continuously sends typhoons toward Taiwan and the vicinity, which greatly increases the threat to the island.

Original languageEnglish
Article number543
JournalAtmosphere
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 May 1

Keywords

  • Pacific subtropical high
  • Steering flow
  • Typhoon path
  • Typhoon track

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The climatological analysis of typhoon tracks, steering flow, and the pacific subtropical high in the vicinity of Taiwan and the Western North Pacific'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this