Temperature modulates the effects of ocean acidification on intestinal ion transport in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua

Marian Y. Hu, Katharina Michael, Cornelia M. Kreiss, Meike Stumpp, Sam Dupont, Yung-Che Tseng, Magnus Lucassen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CO 2 -driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO 3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO 2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid-base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO 2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA), Na + /H + -exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na + /HCO3-cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl-/HCO3-exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H + -ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl- channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO 2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal HCO3-secretion rates in response to CO 2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood HCO3-levels to stabilize pH e , but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans.

Original languageEnglish
Article number198
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume7
Issue numberJUN
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 2

Fingerprint

Gadus morhua
Ion Transport
Carbon Monoxide
Oceans and Seas
Temperature
Intestinal Secretions
Seawater
Ions
Chloride-Bicarbonate Antiporters
Vacuolar Proton-Translocating ATPases
Messenger RNA
Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter
Proton-Translocating ATPases
Acclimatization
Intestinal Mucosa
Bicarbonates
Intestines
Proteins
Salts
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Bicarbonate level
  • Hypercapnia
  • PH regulation
  • Teleost
  • Thermal compensation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Temperature modulates the effects of ocean acidification on intestinal ion transport in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. / Hu, Marian Y.; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M.; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus.

In: Frontiers in Physiology, Vol. 7, No. JUN, 198, 02.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, Marian Y. ; Michael, Katharina ; Kreiss, Cornelia M. ; Stumpp, Meike ; Dupont, Sam ; Tseng, Yung-Che ; Lucassen, Magnus. / Temperature modulates the effects of ocean acidification on intestinal ion transport in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. In: Frontiers in Physiology. 2016 ; Vol. 7, No. JUN.
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