Supplementary catechins attenuate cooking-oil-fumes-induced oxidative stress in rat lung

Chao Huei Yang, Chun Yao Lin, Joan Hwa Yang, Shaw Yih Liou, Ping Chia Li, Chiang Ting Chien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cooking-oil-fumes containing toxic components may induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to oxidize macromolecules and lead to acute lung injury. Our previous study showed that a decaffineated green tea extract containing (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (+)-gallocatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin gallate, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate can inhibit oxidation, inflammation, and apoptosis. We determined whether the catechins supplement may reduce cooking-oil-fumes-induced acute lung injury in rat. In the urethane-anesthetized Wistar rat subjected to 30-120 min of cooking-oil-fumes exposure, blood ROS significantly increased in the recovery stage. After 30-min cooking-oil-fumes exposure, the enhanced blood ROS level further increased in a time-dependent manner during the recovery stage (321 ± 69 counts/10 s after 1 h, 540 ± 89 counts/10 s after 2 h, and 873 ± 112 counts/10 s after 4 h). Four hours after 30-min cooking-oil-fumes exposure, lung lavage neutrophils and ROS as well as lung tissue dityrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal increased significantly. Two weeks of catechins supplememnt significantly reduced the enhanced lavage ROS, lung dityrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal level. Cooking-oil-fumes-induced oxidative stress decreased lung Bcl-2/Bax ratio and HSP70 expression, but catechins treatment preserved the downregulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and HSP70 expression. We conclude that catechins supplement attenuates cooking-oil-fumes-induced acute lung injury via the preservation of oil-smoke induced downregulation of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and chaperone protein expression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-159
Number of pages9
JournalChinese Journal of Physiology
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jan 1

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Catechins
  • Cooking-oil-fumes
  • HSP70
  • Lung
  • Reactive oxygen species

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this