Static and dynamic seductive illustration effects on text-and-graphic learning processes, perceptions, and outcomes: Evidence from eye tracking

Meng Jung Tsai*, An Hsuan Wu, Yuping Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to examine how different forms (still pictures vs. animations) of seductive illustrations impact text-and-graphic learning processes, perceptions, and outcomes. An eye-tracking experiment of three groups (static, dynamic, and control) was conducted with 60 college and graduate students while learning with PowerPoint slides about infant motor development milestones. Prior knowledge, learning performance, learning perception, and visual attention were assessed by achievement tests, self-rated scales, and eye-tracking measures. Analysis of variance and t test results showed that, under a low task-load condition, no seductive details effect was found for learning achievement but was found for learning process and perception. Decreased attention was found in the relevant pictures in both experimental groups. With more deeply and intensively processing on the seductive animations, the dynamic group perceived more distractions than the static group. Lag sequential analysis results revealed different visual transitional patterns for the groups, providing deep understandings about the process of seductive details effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-123
Number of pages15
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Keywords

  • eye tracking
  • lag sequential analysis
  • learning process
  • seductive details
  • text-and-graphic learning
  • visual attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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