Scientific epistemic beliefs, conceptions of learning science and self-efficacy of learning science among high school students

Chin Chung Tsai, Hsin Ning Jessie Ho, Jyh Chong Liang, Hung Ming Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationships among Taiwanese high school students' scientific epistemic beliefs, conceptions of learning science, and self-efficacy of learning science. The questionnaire responses gathered from 377 high school students in Taiwan were utilized to elicit such relationships. The analysis of the structural equation model revealed that students' absolutist scientific epistemic beliefs led to lower-level conceptions of learning science (i.e. learning science as memorizing, preparing for tests, calculating, and practicing) while sophisticated scientific epistemic beliefs might trigger higher-level conceptions of learning science (i.e. learning science as increase of knowledge, applying, and attaining understanding). The students' lower-level conceptions of learning science were also found to negatively associate with their self-efficacy of learning science, while the higher-level conceptions of learning science fostered students' self-efficacy. However, this study found that students who viewed scientific knowledge as uncertain (advanced epistemic belief) tended to possess lower self-efficacy toward learning science.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-769
Number of pages13
JournalLearning and Instruction
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec 1

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Keywords

  • Conceptions of learning
  • Epistemic beliefs
  • Science education
  • Science learning
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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