Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate

Barry A. Spiering, William J. Kraemer, Jakob L. Vingren, Disa L. Hatfield, Maren S. Fragala, Jen-Yu Ho, Carl M. Maresh, Jeffrey M. Anderson, Jeff S. Volek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

L-carnitine L-tartrate (LCLT) supplementation beneficially affects markers of postexercise metabolic stress and muscle damage. However, to date, no study has determined the dose response of LCLT to elicit such responses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different doses of LCLT on criterion variables previously shown to be responsive to LCLT supplementation. Eight healthy men (22 ± 3 y, 174 ± 5 cm, 83.0 ± 15.3 kg) were supplemented with 0 g, 1 g, and 2 g of LCLT for 3 weeks and then performed a bout of resistance exercise (5 sets of 15-20 repetition maximum with a 2-min rest between sets) with associated blood draws. This procedure was performed in a balanced, randomized, repeated measures design. Serum carnitine concentrations increased (p ≤ 0.05) following the 1 g and 2 g doses, with the 2-g dose providing the highest carnitine concentrations. The 1-and 2-g doses reduced postexercise serum hypoxanthine, serum xanthine oxidase, serum myoglobin, and perceived muscle soreness. In conclusion, both the 1- and 2-g doses were effective in mediating various markers of metabolic stress and of muscle soreness. Use of LCLT appears to attenuate metabolic stress and the hypoxic chain of events leading to muscle damage after exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-264
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Carnitine
Physiological Stress
Myalgia
Serum
Exercise
Muscles
tartaric acid
Xanthine Oxidase
Myoglobin

Keywords

  • Ergogenic aids
  • Metabolic stress
  • Performance
  • Recovery
  • Sports supplements
  • Strength training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate. / Spiering, Barry A.; Kraemer, William J.; Vingren, Jakob L.; Hatfield, Disa L.; Fragala, Maren S.; Ho, Jen-Yu; Maresh, Carl M.; Anderson, Jeffrey M.; Volek, Jeff S.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 259-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spiering, BA, Kraemer, WJ, Vingren, JL, Hatfield, DL, Fragala, MS, Ho, J-Y, Maresh, CM, Anderson, JM & Volek, JS 2007, 'Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate', Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 259-264. https://doi.org/10.1519/00124278-200702000-00046
Spiering, Barry A. ; Kraemer, William J. ; Vingren, Jakob L. ; Hatfield, Disa L. ; Fragala, Maren S. ; Ho, Jen-Yu ; Maresh, Carl M. ; Anderson, Jeffrey M. ; Volek, Jeff S. / Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 259-264.
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