Rapid and quantitative discrimination of tumour cells on tissue slices

Kai Wen Huang, Jen Jie Chieh, Shu Hsien Liao, Wen Chun Wei, Pei Yi Hsiao, Hong Chang Yang, Herng Er Horng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After a needle biopsy, immunohistochemistry is generally used to stain tissue slices for clinically confirming tumours. Currently, tissue slices are immersed in a bioprobe-linked fluorescent reagent for several minutes, washed to remove the unbound reagent, and then observed using a fluorescence microscope. However, the observation must be performed by experienced pathologists, and producing a qualitative analysis is time consuming. Therefore, this study proposes a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference device biosusceptometry (SSB) method for avoiding these drawbacks. First, stain reagents were synthesised for the dual modalities of fluorescent and magnetic imaging by combining iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles and the currently used fluorescent reagent. The reagent for the proposed approach was stained using the same procedure as that for the current fluorescent reagent, and tissue slices were rapidly imaged using the developed SSB for obtaining coregistered optical and magnetic images. Analysing the total intensity of magnetic spots in SSB images enables quantitatively determining the tumour cells of tissue slices. To confirm the magnetic imaging results, a traditional observation methodology entailing the use of a fluorescence microscope was also performed as the gold standard. This study determined high consistency between the fluorescent and magnetic spots in different regions of the tissue slices, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach, which will benefit future clinical pathology.

Original languageEnglish
Article number235101
JournalNanotechnology
Volume27
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 May 3

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Keywords

  • fluorescent reagent
  • immunohistochemistry
  • magnetic nanoparticle
  • scanning SQUID biosusceptometry
  • tissue slice
  • tumour cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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