Proton implantation for electrical insulation of the InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice material used in 8-15 μm-emitting quantum cascade lasers

J. D. Kirch, H. Kim, C. Boyle, C. C. Chang, L. J. Mawst, D. Lindberg, T. Earles, D. Botez*, M. Helm, J. Von Borany, S. Akhmadaliev, R. Böttger, C. Reyner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We demonstrate the conversion of lattice-matched InGaAs/InAlAs quantum-cascade-laser (QCL) active-region material into an effective current-blocking layer via proton implantation. A 35-period active region of an 8.4 μm-emitting QCL structure was implanted with a dose of 5 × 1014 cm−2 protons at 450 keV to produce a vacancy concentration of ∼1019cm−3. At room temperature, the sheet resistance, extracted from the Hall measurements, increases by a factor of ∼240 with respect to that of an unimplanted material. Over the 160-320 K temperature range, the activation energy of the implanted-material Hall sheet-carrier density is 270 meV. The significant increase in room-temperature sheet resistance indicates that upon implantation deep carrier traps have been formed in the InAlAs layers of the superlattice. Fabricated mesas show effective current blocking, at voltages ≥10 V, up to at least 350 K. Thus, the implanted InGaAs/InAlAs superlattices are highly resistive to at least 350 K heat sink temperature. Such implanted material should prove useful for effective current confinement in 8-15 μm-emitting InP-based single-emitter QCL structures as well as in resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of QCLs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number082102
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume110
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Feb 20
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

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