Predicting College Students’ Adoption of Technology for Self-Directed Learning: A Model Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior With Self-Evaluation as an Intermediate Variable

Sy Yi Tzeng, Kuen Yi Lin*, Chih Yu Lee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many studies assume a significant relationship between intention and behavior. However, the data do not always support this assumption. This study used a modified version of social cognitive theory with self-evaluations as an intermediate variable to explore and resolve the problems associated with applying the theory of planned behavior to explain students’ adoption of technology for self-directed learning. We surveyed 285 college students who enrolled in an e-book publishing course using multifaceted technological learning tools. We found that, as an intermediate variable, self-evaluation enhanced the influence of intentions on behavior and improved the accuracy of predictions of college students’ adoption of technology for self-directed learning. Students’ attitudes and perceived behavioral control were important factors influencing their adoption of technology for self-directed learning through their effects on intention; subjective norms were not important in this respect.

Original languageEnglish
Article number865803
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 May 9

Keywords

  • intention
  • intermediate effect
  • self-directed learning behaviors
  • self-evaluation
  • theory of planned behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

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