Positional and phonotactic effects on the realization of Taiwan Mandarin tone 2

Janice Fon, Hui Ju Hsu

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This study investigates how phonotactics and sentential positioning affect the realization of Taiwan Mandarin Tone 2. 10 Taipei speakers read sentences containing target syllables of different syllable types in isolation and in various sentential positions. Results showed that comparing across five different phonotactic types, N-initial syllables were relatively high at the onset, the turning point, and the offset while G-initial syllables were low at all three points. V-initial syllables were high at the turning point and the offset while obstruent-initial syllables ended with relatively low pitch. In general, the offset is higher than the onset point when the syllable was read in isolation or sentence-finally. However, in sentence-initial and -medial positions, the onset tended to be higher in pitch than the offset, especially in female speech. V-initial syllables tended to have higher offsets than onsets regardless of positions. In terms of duration, the falling ratio is the highest sentence-medially. With L-initial and N-initial syllables, the falling ratio was over 50% of the total syllable sentence-medially and -finally. There was no difference in the degree of steepness between the falling and the rising portions of the tone, but female speakers in general showed steeper slopes than male, especially in sentence-final positions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages501-504
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event8th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, ICSLP 2004 - Jeju, Jeju Island, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 2004 Oct 42004 Oct 8

Other

Other8th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, ICSLP 2004
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityJeju, Jeju Island
Period04/10/404/10/8

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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    Fon, J., & Hsu, H. J. (2004). Positional and phonotactic effects on the realization of Taiwan Mandarin tone 2. 501-504. Paper presented at 8th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, ICSLP 2004, Jeju, Jeju Island, Korea, Republic of.