Information quality, work-family conflict, loneliness, and well-being in remote work settings

Ya Ting Chuang, Hua Ling Chiang, An Pan Lin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Teleworking has rapidly grown and become the prevailing work mode. Married teleworkers may experience increased work-family conflict, while single teleworkers may experience loneliness. This study aims to investigate how teleworkers' information reception quality (Time 1) influences their work-family conflict (Time 2), loneliness (Time 2), and well-being (Time 3) from the perspective of the job demands-resources model. The data were collected through a three-point survey involving 462 participants working from home in Taiwan. The results indicate a negative association between information accuracy and work-family conflict. Work-family conflict, in turn, mediates the relationship between information accuracy and well-being. Information timeliness, as the moderator, weakens the connection between information accuracy and work-family conflict. Additionally, information timeliness is negatively related to loneliness. Loneliness mediates the relationship between information timeliness and well-being. Information accuracy, as the moderator, strengthens the association between information timeliness and loneliness. No impact of information on family-work conflict was observed. Our findings suggest that organizations that convey precise and punctual messages to employees have distinct routes for reducing work-family interference and loneliness and ultimately improving employees’ well-being in remote work contexts. This study contributes to the wider telework literature through information experience.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108149
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume154
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024 May

Keywords

  • Information accuracy
  • Information timeliness
  • Job demands-resources model
  • Loneliness
  • Remote work
  • Well-being
  • Work-family conflict

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • General Psychology

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