Impact of misplaced words in reading comprehension of Chinese sentences: Evidences from eye movement and electroencephalography

Hong Fa Ho, Guan An Chen, Celesamae T. Vicente

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This pilot study aimed to investigate the impact of misplaced words in Chinese sentences by using eye-Tracker and electroencephalography (EEG) technology. There were 5 participants. Four of which were graduate students and one was a college student. Their average age was 24.4 years old. The participants were asked to read text with and without misplaced words. After reading, they were asked to answer a question that determined whether they understood the content of the stimulus previously displayed. Eye movement data and attention levels were recorded using an eye tracker and an EEG device. The data were saved in the background system automatically and synchronously while the experiment was performed. The findings suggest that: 1.) The number of misplaced words do not affect the reading comprehension of participants. Instead, wrong answers resulted from the question that evaluated the reading comprehension on one stimulus that contained too many information 2.) In increasing the number of misplaced words in a stimulus, participants did not spend more time gazing at them in comparison to other stimuli that had lesser or no misplaced words 3.) When asked to read a stimulus as quickly as possible, the analysis showed that most of the participants did not gaze longer at the regions of the misplaced words. They spent less than 5% of the time gazing at these regions of interest 4.) EEG data analysis yielded mixed results since some participants that gazed at misplaced words had high attention levels and some did not show an increase in their attention levels.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWorkshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015
EditorsYing-Tien Wu, Tomoko Kojiri, Siu Cheung Kong, Feiyue Qiu, Hiroaki Ogata, Thepchai Supnithi, Yonggu Wang, Weiqin Chen
PublisherAsia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education
Pages573-579
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9784990801472
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1
Event23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015 - Hangzhou, China
Duration: 2015 Nov 302015 Dec 4

Publication series

NameWorkshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015

Other

Other23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015
CountryChina
CityHangzhou
Period15/11/3015/12/4

Fingerprint

Eye movements
Electroencephalography
comprehension
stimulus
Students
evidence
data analysis
student
Experiments
graduate
experiment

Keywords

  • Electroencephalography (EEG)
  • Eye-Tracker
  • Misplaced words in Chinese

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

Cite this

Ho, H. F., Chen, G. A., & Vicente, C. T. (2015). Impact of misplaced words in reading comprehension of Chinese sentences: Evidences from eye movement and electroencephalography. In Y-T. Wu, T. Kojiri, S. C. Kong, F. Qiu, H. Ogata, T. Supnithi, Y. Wang, ... W. Chen (Eds.), Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015 (pp. 573-579). (Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015). Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education.

Impact of misplaced words in reading comprehension of Chinese sentences : Evidences from eye movement and electroencephalography. / Ho, Hong Fa; Chen, Guan An; Vicente, Celesamae T.

Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015. ed. / Ying-Tien Wu; Tomoko Kojiri; Siu Cheung Kong; Feiyue Qiu; Hiroaki Ogata; Thepchai Supnithi; Yonggu Wang; Weiqin Chen. Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2015. p. 573-579 (Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ho, HF, Chen, GA & Vicente, CT 2015, Impact of misplaced words in reading comprehension of Chinese sentences: Evidences from eye movement and electroencephalography. in Y-T Wu, T Kojiri, SC Kong, F Qiu, H Ogata, T Supnithi, Y Wang & W Chen (eds), Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015. Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015, Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, pp. 573-579, 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015, Hangzhou, China, 15/11/30.
Ho HF, Chen GA, Vicente CT. Impact of misplaced words in reading comprehension of Chinese sentences: Evidences from eye movement and electroencephalography. In Wu Y-T, Kojiri T, Kong SC, Qiu F, Ogata H, Supnithi T, Wang Y, Chen W, editors, Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015. Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education. 2015. p. 573-579. (Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015).
Ho, Hong Fa ; Chen, Guan An ; Vicente, Celesamae T. / Impact of misplaced words in reading comprehension of Chinese sentences : Evidences from eye movement and electroencephalography. Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015. editor / Ying-Tien Wu ; Tomoko Kojiri ; Siu Cheung Kong ; Feiyue Qiu ; Hiroaki Ogata ; Thepchai Supnithi ; Yonggu Wang ; Weiqin Chen. Asia-Pacific Society for Computers in Education, 2015. pp. 573-579 (Workshop Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2015).
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