Imaging the distribution of magnetic nanoparticles on animal bodies using scanning SQUID biosusceptometry attached with a video camera

Jen-Je Chieh, Herng-Er Horng, W. K. Tseng, Shieh-Yueh Yang, C. Y. Hong, Hong-Chang Yang, C. C. Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To image magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on animal bodies, physicians often use magnetic resonance imaging to determine the superparamagnetic characteristics of MNPs during preoperative analysis. However, magnetic resonance imaging is unsuitable for other biomedical applications, such as the curative surgical resection of tumors or pharmacokinetic studies of MNPs, because of the requirement of nonmetal environments and high financial cost of frequent examination, respectively. Thus, researchers have proposed other nonmagnetic imaging technologies, such as fluorescence, using multimodal MNPs with nonmagnetic indicators. The development of a magnetic instrument based on the other magnetic characteristics of MNPs avoids the disadvantages of multimodal MNPs, including the biosafety risk. On the basis of the alternating current susceptibility of MNPs, previous research has demonstrated the magnetic examination of scanning superconducting-quantum-interference-device biosusceptometry (SSB). This study, using a low-noise charge-coupled-device type of a video camera, reports the integration of SSB and charge-coupled-device to immediately image the magnetic signals on animal bodies or organic tissue. This real-time imaging by SSB increases the usefulness of MNPs for more clinical applications, including the imaging-guided curative surgical resection of tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6359776
JournalIEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb 11

Fingerprint

SQUIDs
Video cameras
animals
Animals
cameras
Nanoparticles
Scanning
Imaging techniques
nanoparticles
scanning
Magnetic resonance
Charge coupled devices
magnetic resonance
Tumors
charge coupled devices
tumors
examination
Nonmetals
magnetic signals
Pharmacokinetics

Keywords

  • AC susceptibility
  • magnetic nanoparticles
  • scanning SQUID biosusceptometry
  • video camera

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Imaging the distribution of magnetic nanoparticles on animal bodies using scanning SQUID biosusceptometry attached with a video camera. / Chieh, Jen-Je; Horng, Herng-Er; Tseng, W. K.; Yang, Shieh-Yueh; Hong, C. Y.; Yang, Hong-Chang; Wu, C. C.

In: IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity, Vol. 23, No. 3, 6359776, 11.02.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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