Gender network dynamics in prosocial and aggressive behavior of early adolescents

Yuan Hsiao, Ching Ling Cheng, Ya Wen Chiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Network selection and influence on aggressive and prosocial behavior have been of great concern, but current research is limited by predominant studies in European-American societies and insufficient consideration on gender networks. Using panel data from 702 seventh grade students in a Chinese society, we show that while results are in general consistent with European-American samples, network processes differ between all ties, male ties, female ties, and cross-gender ties. Furthermore, the prevalence of behavior is often at odds with influence effects in gender networks. This article demonstrates the necessity to distinguish sub-networks within networks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-23
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Networks
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jul 1

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Adolescent Behavior
aggressive behavior
adolescent
gender
Students
Research
school grade
society
student

Keywords

  • Aggressive behavior
  • Gender networks
  • Network selection
  • Peer influence
  • Prosocial behavior
  • SienaBayes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Gender network dynamics in prosocial and aggressive behavior of early adolescents. / Hsiao, Yuan; Cheng, Ching Ling; Chiu, Ya Wen.

In: Social Networks, Vol. 58, 01.07.2019, p. 12-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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