Food and nutrient intakes for families in Taipei, Taiwan

Li-Ching Lyu, Ya Ping Yu, Jung Sheng Lee, Jia Hui Lin, Huei I. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The main purpose of this study is to examine food consumption and food security issues for families in urbanized Taiwan using household interviews ( n = 240), and to collect dietary information from each family member ( n = 882) using 24-h recalls and Chinese food frequency questionnaires (CFFQ). We developed a local food composition table suitable for families with children and intend to explore the possible nutritional risk and needs for low-income families ( n = 30) compared to middle-income families ( n = 210). The average frequency of shopping for food was 3 times per week, and the most influential persons for family food intake were mothers (46%) and children (26%). The low-income families had more frequent food security worries than middle-income families (72 versus 10 times/year, respectively) and provided significantly fewer dairy products, fruits and fish in daily meals. From 24-h recalls, parents had significantly higher alcohol intake in low-income families than middle-income families. From CFFQ, fathers had consistently strong associations for calcium and iron with daughters ( r = 0.34, 0.30) and sons ( r = 0.28, 0.30); however mothers had strong associations for vitamin B1 and vitamin B2 with daughters ( r = 0.21, 0.24) and sons ( r = 0.25, 0.27). Issues of food insecurity and disadvantages in nutrient consumption are of concern for low-income families in urbanized Taiwan.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Food Composition and Analysis
Volume19
Issue numberSUPPL.
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Aug 1

Fingerprint

low income households
Taiwan
nutrient intake
household income
food intake
Eating
food security
Food
food frequency questionnaires
Nuclear Family
food purchasing
Food Supply
nutrient databanks
fathers
riboflavin
thiamin
food consumption
dairy products
households
interviews

Keywords

  • Food composition table
  • Food security
  • Low-income family
  • Nutrient intakes
  • Taiwan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Food and nutrient intakes for families in Taipei, Taiwan. / Lyu, Li-Ching; Yu, Ya Ping; Lee, Jung Sheng; Lin, Jia Hui; Wang, Huei I.

In: Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, Vol. 19, No. SUPPL., 01.08.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyu, Li-Ching ; Yu, Ya Ping ; Lee, Jung Sheng ; Lin, Jia Hui ; Wang, Huei I. / Food and nutrient intakes for families in Taipei, Taiwan. In: Journal of Food Composition and Analysis. 2006 ; Vol. 19, No. SUPPL.
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