Exploring the effects of integrating self-explanation into a multi-user game on the acquisition of scientific concepts

Chung Yuan Hsu, Chin Chung Tsai, Hung Yuan Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the impacts of embedding collaboration into a game with a self-explanation design for supporting the acquisition of light and shadow concepts. The participants were 184 fourth graders who were randomly assigned to three conditions: a solitary mode of the game with self-explanation, a collaborative mode with self-explanation, or the control condition of a single-user game without integrating self-explanation. Students' conceptual understanding was measured through an immediate posttest and a retention test with a three-week delay. Further, students' engagement in answering the prompts was also investigated. The findings showed that having students collaboratively play science-based games with a self-explanation design embedded was not sufficient to help them learn the science concepts. Rather, it was the level of engagement in responding to the self-explanation prompts that mattered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)844-858
Number of pages15
JournalInteractive Learning Environments
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 May 18

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Keywords

  • collaboration
  • game-based learning
  • multiplayer game
  • science learning
  • self-explanation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Exploring the effects of integrating self-explanation into a multi-user game on the acquisition of scientific concepts. / Hsu, Chung Yuan; Tsai, Chin Chung; Wang, Hung Yuan.

In: Interactive Learning Environments, Vol. 24, No. 4, 18.05.2016, p. 844-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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