Exploring the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive function

Yu Kai Chang*, Jennifer L. Etnier

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

111 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between resistance exercise intensity and cognitive performance. Sixty-eight participants were randomly assigned into control, 40%, 70%, or 100% of 10-repetition maximal resistance exercise groups. Participants were tested on Day 1 (baseline) and on Day 2 (measures were taken relative to performance of the treatment). Heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, self-reported arousal, and affect were assessed on both days. Cognitive performance was assessed on Day 1 and before and following treatment on Day 2. Results from regression analyses indicated that there is a significant linear effect of exercise intensity on information processing speed, and a significant quadratic trend for exercise intensity on executive function. Thus, there is a dose-response relationship between the intensity of resistance exercise and cognitive performance such that high-intensity exercise benefits speed of processing, but moderate intensity exercise is most beneficial for executive function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)640-656
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Oct
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Executive function
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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