Evidence for the indirect effects of perceived public stigma on psychosocial outcomes: The mediating role of self-stigma

Yu Chen Kao, Yin Ju Lien, Hsin An Chang, Sheng Chiang Wang, Nian Sheng Tzeng, Ching Hui Loh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the possible mediating role of self-stigma in the relationship between perceived public stigma and psychosocial outcomes and how this mechanism may be contingent on illness severity in a non-Western (Chinese) sample. A total of 251 participants, namely 151 psychiatric outpatients with psychotic disorders and 100 psychiatric outpatients without psychotic disorders, completed a questionnaire on stigma and psychosocial outcomes that covered topics such as self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and subjective quality of life (QoL). Using a cross-sectional design, ordinary least squares regression and bootstrapping mediation analyses were used to test whether self-stigma mediated the relationship between perceived public stigma and psychosocial outcomes and whether this mediating process was moderated by diagnostic status. The results indicated that self-stigma mediated the effect of perceived public stigma on psychosocial outcomes such as self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and subjective QoL among both patients with psychotic disorders and those without psychotic disorders after controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics. Further, moderated mediation analyses revealed that the indirect effect of perceived public stigma on psychosocial outcomes were not moderated by the status of psychotic diagnoses. Self-stigma might be an essential and tractable target for interventions aimed at breaking the vicious cycle of discrimination and stigmatization toward people with mental illness regardless of their diagnoses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-195
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume240
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 30

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Psychotic Disorders
Self Concept
Psychiatry
Outpatients
Quality of Life
Depression
Stereotyping
Least-Squares Analysis
Demography

Keywords

  • Mediation
  • Mental health
  • Moderated mediation
  • Perceived stigma
  • Self-stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Evidence for the indirect effects of perceived public stigma on psychosocial outcomes : The mediating role of self-stigma. / Kao, Yu Chen; Lien, Yin Ju; Chang, Hsin An; Wang, Sheng Chiang; Tzeng, Nian Sheng; Loh, Ching Hui.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 240, 30.06.2016, p. 187-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kao, Yu Chen ; Lien, Yin Ju ; Chang, Hsin An ; Wang, Sheng Chiang ; Tzeng, Nian Sheng ; Loh, Ching Hui. / Evidence for the indirect effects of perceived public stigma on psychosocial outcomes : The mediating role of self-stigma. In: Psychiatry Research. 2016 ; Vol. 240. pp. 187-195.
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