Employing augmented-reality-embedded instruction to disperse the imparities of individual differences in earth science learning

Cheng ping Chen, Chang Hwa Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies have proven that merging hands-on and online learning can result in an enhanced experience in learning science. In contrast to traditional online learning, multiple in-classroom activities may be involved in an augmented-reality (AR)-embedded e-learning process and thus could reduce the effects of individual differences. Using a three-stage AR-embedded instructional process, we conducted an experiment to investigate the influences of individual differences on learning earth science phenomena of '‘day, night, and seasons’' for junior highs. The mixed-methods sequential explanatory design was employed. In the quantitative phase, factors of learning styles and ICT competences were examined alongside with the overall learning achievement. Independent t tests and ANCOVAs were employed to achieve inferential statistics. The results showed that overall learning achievement was significant for the AR-embedded instruction. Nevertheless, neither of the two learner factors exhibited significant effect on learning achievement. In the qualitative phase, we analyzed student interview records, and a wide variation on student’s preferred instructional stages were revealed. These findings could provide an alternative rationale for developing ICT-supported instruction, as our three-stage AR-embedded comprehensive e-learning scheme could enhance instruction adaptiveness to disperse the imparities of individual differences between learners.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)835-847
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Science Education and Technology
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Earth sciences
Augmented reality
instruction
science
learning
Students
Merging
electronic learning
Statistics
inferential statistics
learning process
student
Experiments
classroom
experiment
interview

Keywords

  • Augmented-reality-embedded instruction
  • Blended learning
  • ICT competence
  • Individual difference
  • Learning style

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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