Effects of video caption modes on English listening comprehension and vocabulary acquisitions using handheld devices

Ching Kun Hsu, Gwo Jen Hwang, Yu Tzu Chang, Chih Kai Chang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study used different display modes of video captions in mobile devices, including non-caption, full-caption, and target-words, for English comprehension and vocabulary acquisition of fifth graders. During the one-month experiment, the students' English listening comprehension and vocabulary acquisition status was evaluated per week. From the experimental results, it was found that the English target-word group had as satisfactory learning achievement as the full-caption group in terms of vocabulary acquisition, and both groups outperformed the non-caption group. Moreover, the visual style students in the English target-word group and full-caption group had better learning effectiveness in terms of vocabulary acquisition than those in the non-caption group. Furthermore, in terms of listening comprehension, the students in the three groups all made remarkable progress without significant difference.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2011
Pages281-288
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes
Event19th International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2011 - Chiang Mai, Thailand
Duration: 2011 Nov 282011 Dec 2

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2011

Other

Other19th International Conference on Computers in Education, ICCE 2011
CountryThailand
CityChiang Mai
Period11/11/2811/12/2

Keywords

  • Captions
  • Learning styles
  • Listening comprehension
  • Vocabulary acquisition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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