Effects of training using an active video game on agility and balance

H. Su, Y. K. Chang, Y. J. Lin, I. H. Chu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim. The aim of this paper was to examine the effects of training using Xbox Kinect on agility and balance in healthy young adults. Methods. Forty-three healthy adults (aged 20 to 30 years) were randomized to either an intervention or control group. The intervention group played Xbox Kinect 3 times per week, for an average of 20 minutes per session for 6 weeks. The control group did not play Xbox Kinect. All the participants completed assessments of agility and balance at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Results. After 6 weeks of training the intervention group showed signiicant improvement in agility at 2 weeks and showed continued improvement at 4 and 6 weeks (P<0.05). Dynamic balance in the medial and posterior directions also began to improve in the intervention group at 2 weeks and showed continued improvement at 4 and 6 weeks (P<0.05). There was no signiicant difference between the intervention and control group in static balance (P=0.538). Conclusion. A 6-week active video game training program appears to be effective in improving agility and dynamic balance in the medial and posterior directions in healthy young adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)914-921
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Volume55
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Sep
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Physical itness
  • Postural balance
  • Video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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