Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness enhancement on deficits in visuospatial working memory in children with developmental coordination disorder: A cognitive electrophysiological study

Chia Liang Tsai, Yu Kai Chang, Fu Chen Chen, Tsung Min Hung, Chien Yu Pan, Chun Hao Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study aimed to explore the effectiveness of chronic aerobic exercise intervention on the behavioral and neuroelectric performances of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) when carrying out a visuospatial working memory (VSWM) task. Twenty typically developing children and 40 children with DCD, equally divided into DCD-training and DCD nontraining groups, performed the cognitive task with concomitant event-related potential recording before and after 16 weeks of endurance training. Results indicated that the children with DCD displayed VSWM deficits with regard to behavioral performance (i.e., slower reaction time and low accuracy rate) and the neuroelectric indices (i.e., smaller P3 and pSW amplitudes) during the retrieval-process phase as reported in previous studies. However, after the exercise intervention, DCD-training group showed significantly higher accuracy rates and enhanced P3 amplitudes during the encoding and retrieval-process phases, compared with their pre-training performances. These findings suggest that increased cardiorespiratory fitness could effectively improve the performance of the VSWM task in children with DCD, by enabling the allocation of greater working memory resources related to encoding and retrieval.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-185
Number of pages13
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Motor Skills Disorders
Short-Term Memory
Exercise
Memory Disorders
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Evoked Potentials
Reaction Time

Keywords

  • Cardiorespiratory fitness
  • Developmental coordination disorder
  • Event-related potential
  • Exercise intervention
  • Working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness enhancement on deficits in visuospatial working memory in children with developmental coordination disorder : A cognitive electrophysiological study. / Tsai, Chia Liang; Chang, Yu Kai; Chen, Fu Chen; Hung, Tsung Min; Pan, Chien Yu; Wang, Chun Hao.

In: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.03.2014, p. 173-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1fd116b3f92b465d83bafd97ec5865a1,
title = "Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness enhancement on deficits in visuospatial working memory in children with developmental coordination disorder: A cognitive electrophysiological study",
abstract = "The present study aimed to explore the effectiveness of chronic aerobic exercise intervention on the behavioral and neuroelectric performances of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) when carrying out a visuospatial working memory (VSWM) task. Twenty typically developing children and 40 children with DCD, equally divided into DCD-training and DCD nontraining groups, performed the cognitive task with concomitant event-related potential recording before and after 16 weeks of endurance training. Results indicated that the children with DCD displayed VSWM deficits with regard to behavioral performance (i.e., slower reaction time and low accuracy rate) and the neuroelectric indices (i.e., smaller P3 and pSW amplitudes) during the retrieval-process phase as reported in previous studies. However, after the exercise intervention, DCD-training group showed significantly higher accuracy rates and enhanced P3 amplitudes during the encoding and retrieval-process phases, compared with their pre-training performances. These findings suggest that increased cardiorespiratory fitness could effectively improve the performance of the VSWM task in children with DCD, by enabling the allocation of greater working memory resources related to encoding and retrieval.",
keywords = "Cardiorespiratory fitness, Developmental coordination disorder, Event-related potential, Exercise intervention, Working memory",
author = "Tsai, {Chia Liang} and Chang, {Yu Kai} and Chen, {Fu Chen} and Hung, {Tsung Min} and Pan, {Chien Yu} and Wang, {Chun Hao}",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/arclin/act081",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "173--185",
journal = "Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology",
issn = "0887-6177",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of cardiorespiratory fitness enhancement on deficits in visuospatial working memory in children with developmental coordination disorder

T2 - A cognitive electrophysiological study

AU - Tsai, Chia Liang

AU - Chang, Yu Kai

AU - Chen, Fu Chen

AU - Hung, Tsung Min

AU - Pan, Chien Yu

AU - Wang, Chun Hao

PY - 2014/3/1

Y1 - 2014/3/1

N2 - The present study aimed to explore the effectiveness of chronic aerobic exercise intervention on the behavioral and neuroelectric performances of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) when carrying out a visuospatial working memory (VSWM) task. Twenty typically developing children and 40 children with DCD, equally divided into DCD-training and DCD nontraining groups, performed the cognitive task with concomitant event-related potential recording before and after 16 weeks of endurance training. Results indicated that the children with DCD displayed VSWM deficits with regard to behavioral performance (i.e., slower reaction time and low accuracy rate) and the neuroelectric indices (i.e., smaller P3 and pSW amplitudes) during the retrieval-process phase as reported in previous studies. However, after the exercise intervention, DCD-training group showed significantly higher accuracy rates and enhanced P3 amplitudes during the encoding and retrieval-process phases, compared with their pre-training performances. These findings suggest that increased cardiorespiratory fitness could effectively improve the performance of the VSWM task in children with DCD, by enabling the allocation of greater working memory resources related to encoding and retrieval.

AB - The present study aimed to explore the effectiveness of chronic aerobic exercise intervention on the behavioral and neuroelectric performances of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) when carrying out a visuospatial working memory (VSWM) task. Twenty typically developing children and 40 children with DCD, equally divided into DCD-training and DCD nontraining groups, performed the cognitive task with concomitant event-related potential recording before and after 16 weeks of endurance training. Results indicated that the children with DCD displayed VSWM deficits with regard to behavioral performance (i.e., slower reaction time and low accuracy rate) and the neuroelectric indices (i.e., smaller P3 and pSW amplitudes) during the retrieval-process phase as reported in previous studies. However, after the exercise intervention, DCD-training group showed significantly higher accuracy rates and enhanced P3 amplitudes during the encoding and retrieval-process phases, compared with their pre-training performances. These findings suggest that increased cardiorespiratory fitness could effectively improve the performance of the VSWM task in children with DCD, by enabling the allocation of greater working memory resources related to encoding and retrieval.

KW - Cardiorespiratory fitness

KW - Developmental coordination disorder

KW - Event-related potential

KW - Exercise intervention

KW - Working memory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894574855&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84894574855&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/arclin/act081

DO - 10.1093/arclin/act081

M3 - Article

C2 - 24172937

AN - SCOPUS:84894574855

VL - 29

SP - 173

EP - 185

JO - Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology

JF - Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology

SN - 0887-6177

IS - 2

ER -