Dispersal history of Miniopterus fuliginosus bats and their associated viruses in east Asia

Thachawech Kimprasit, Mitsuo Nunome, Keisuke Iida, Yoshitaka Murakami, Min Liang Wong, Chung Hsin Wu, Ryosuke Kobayashi, Yupadee Hengjan, Hitoshi Takemae, Kenzo Yonemitsu, Ryusei Kuwata, Hiroshi Shimoda, Lifan Si, Joon Hyuk Sohn, Susumu Asakawa, Kenji Ichiyanagi, Ken Maeda, Hong Shik Oh, Tetsuya Mizutani, Junpei KimuraAtsuo Iida, Eiichi Hondo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this study, we examined the role of the eastern bent-winged bat (Miniopterus fuliginosus) in the dispersion of bat adenovirus and bat alphacoronavirus in east Asia, considering their gene flows and divergence times (based on deep-sequencing data), using bat fecal guano samples. Bats in China moved to Jeju Island and/or Taiwan in the last 20,000 years via the Korean Peninsula and/or Japan. The phylogenies of host mitochondrial D-loop DNA was not significantly congruent with those of bat adenovirus (m2XY = 0.07, p = 0.08), and bat alphacoronavirus (m2XY = 0.48, p = 0.20). We estimate that the first divergence time of bats carrying bat adenovirus in five caves studied (designated as K1, K2, JJ, N2, and F3) occurred approximately 3.17 million years ago. In contrast, the first divergence time of bat adenovirus among bats in the 5 caves was estimated to be approximately 224.32 years ago. The first divergence time of bats in caves CH, JJ, WY, N2, F1, F2, and F3 harboring bat alphacoronavirus was estimated to be 1.59 million years ago. The first divergence time of bat alphacoronavirus among the 7 caves was estimated to be approximately 2,596.92 years ago. The origin of bat adenovirus remains unclear, whereas our findings suggest that bat alphacoronavirus originated in Japan. Surprisingly, bat adenovirus and bat alphacoronavirus appeared to diverge substantially over the last 100 years, even though our gene-flow data indicate that the eastern bent-winged bat serves as an important natural reservoir of both viruses.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0244006
JournalPloS one
Volume16
Issue number1 January
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Jan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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