Did Acidic Stress Resistance in Vertebrates Evolve as Na+/H+ Exchanger-Mediated Ammonia Excretion in Fish?

Yung Che Tseng, Jia Jiun Yan, Fumiya Furukawa, Pung Pung Hwang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How vertebrates evolved different traits for acid excretion to maintain body fluid pH homeostasis is largely unknown. The evolution of Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE)-mediated NH4 + excretion in fishes is reported, and the coevolution with increased ammoniagenesis and accompanying gluconeogenesis is speculated to benefit vertebrates in terms of both internal homeostasis and energy metabolism response to acidic stress. The findings provide new insights into our understanding of the possible adaptation of fishes to progressing global environmental acidification. In human kidney, titratable H+ and NH4 + comprise the two main components of net acid excretion. V-type H+-ATPase-mediated H+ excretion may have developed in stenohaline lampreys when they initially invaded freshwater from marine habitats, but this trait is lost in most fishes. Instead, increased reliance on NHE-mediated NH4 + excretion is gradually developed and intensified during fish evolution. Further investigations on more species will be needed to support the hypothesis. Also see the video abstract here https://youtu.be/vZuObtfm-34.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1900161
JournalBioEssays
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 May 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • NH excretion
  • Na/H exchanger
  • acid-base regulation
  • acidic stress
  • evolution
  • fishes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology

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