Development of processing speed in the United States and Taiwan: A brief report

Hsinyi Chen*, Yung Kun Liao, Richard Lynn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Processing speed is a critical component of intelligence, and an important cognitive ability in the facilitation of human learning. Previous studies have examined the development of processing speed across cultures. This study investigated processing speed performance using collective data from standardized Wechsler scales in the United States and Taiwan from the past two decades. Drawing comparisons between national norms from ages 4 to 80 years, the results revealed that older people in Taiwan recorded slower processing speeds than their US counterparts. Conversely, younger people in Taiwan recorded faster processing speeds than their US counterparts. This evidence shows that physiological, environmental, and genetic factors contribute to group differences in the development of processing speed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111227
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume184
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jan

Keywords

  • Age
  • Cross-cultural comparison
  • Intelligence
  • Processing speed
  • Wechsler tests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Development of processing speed in the United States and Taiwan: A brief report'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this