Dehulled adlay consumption modulates blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats and overweight and obese young adults

Wan Ju Yeh, Jung Ko, Wei Yi Cheng, Hsin Yi Yang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

High blood pressure is a crucial risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases, and a diet rich in whole-grain foods may modulate blood pressure. This study investigated the effects of dehulled adlay consumption on blood pressure in vivo. We initially fed spontaneous hypertensive rats diets without (SHR group) or with 12 or 24% dehulled adlay (SHR + LA and SHR + HA groups), and discovered that it could limit blood pressure increases over a 12-week experimental period. Although we found no significant changes in plasma, heart, and kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme activities, both adlay-consuming groups had lower endothelin-1 and creatinine concentrations than the SHR group; the SHR + HA group also had lower aspartate aminotransferase and uric acid levels than the SHR group did. We later recruited 23 participants with overweight and obesity, and they consumed 60 g of dehulled adlay daily for a six-week experimental period. At the end of the study, we observed a significant decrease in the group’s systolic blood pressure (SBP), and the change in SBP was even more evident in participants with high baseline SBP. In conclusion, our results suggested that daily intake of dehulled adlay had beneficial effects in blood-pressure management. Future studies may further clarify the possible underlying mechanisms for the consuming of dehulled adlay as a beneficial dietary approach for people at risk of hypertension.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2305
JournalNutrients
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Jul

Keywords

  • ACE
  • Adlay
  • Blood pressure
  • ET-1
  • Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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