Consumption of Dehulled Adlay Improved Lipid Metabolism and Inflammation in Overweight and Obese Individuals after a 6-Week Single-Arm Pilot Study

Wei Yi Cheng, Wan Ju Yeh, Jung Ko, Ya Ling Huang, Hsin Yi Yang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is a major public health concern worldwide with a rising prevalence. Diets containing whole grains have been demonstrated to benefit body composition and inflammatory conditions in individuals at a high risk of metabolic disorders. This study investigated the effects of dehulled adlay on blood lipids and inflammation in overweight and obese adults. We recruited 21 individuals with abdominal obesity to participate in a 6-week experiment, providing them 60 g of dehulled adlay powder per day as a substitute for their daily staple. Before and after the 6-week intervention, we performed anthropometric analyses and measured blood lipid profiles, adi-pokines, and markers of inflammation. At the end of the study, the percentage of body fat mass, blood total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were significantly decreased compared with the base-line. Plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, leptin, and malondialdehyde levels were also reduced. In addition, participants with higher basal blood lipid levels exhibited enhanced lipid lowering effects after the dehulled adlay intervention. These results suggest that a dietary pattern containing 60 g of dehulled adlay per day may have a beneficial effect on lipid profiles and inflammatory markers in individuals that are overweight and obese.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2250
JournalNutrients
Volume14
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jun 1

Keywords

  • dehulled adlay
  • inflammation
  • lipids
  • obesity
  • overweight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Consumption of Dehulled Adlay Improved Lipid Metabolism and Inflammation in Overweight and Obese Individuals after a 6-Week Single-Arm Pilot Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this