Conceptual models and cognitive learning styles in teaching recursion

Cheng-Chih Wu, Nell B. Dale, Lowell J. Bethel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An experimental research design was implemented in an attempt to understand how different types of conceptual models and cognitive learning styles influence novice programmers when learning recursion. The results indicate that in teaching recursion to novice programmers: • concrete conceptual models are better than abstract conceptual models, • novices with abstract learning styles perform better than those with concrete learning styles, • abstract learners do not necessarily benefit more from abstract conceptual models, and • concrete learners do not necessarily benefit more from concrete conceptual models.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-296
Number of pages5
JournalSIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education)
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998 Jan 1

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Teaching
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Food Science
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

Conceptual models and cognitive learning styles in teaching recursion. / Wu, Cheng-Chih; Dale, Nell B.; Bethel, Lowell J.

In: SIGCSE Bulletin (Association for Computing Machinery, Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education), Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.1998, p. 292-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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