Combining normobaric hypoxia with short-term resistance training has no additive beneficial effect on muscular performance and body composition

Jen-Yu Ho, Tai Yu Kuo, Kuan Lin Liu, Xiang Yi Dong, Kang Tung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ho, J-Y, Kuo, T-Y, Liu, K-L, Dong, X-Y, and Tung, K. Combining normobaric hypoxia with short-term resistance training has no additive beneficial effect on muscular performance and body composition. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 935-941, 2014- The aim of this study was to determine the effects of shortterm resistance training combined with systemic hypoxia on muscular performance and body composition. Eighteen resistance-untrained men (21.3 ± 2.0 years, 172.7 ± 5.5 cm, 67.3 ± 9.7 kg) were matched and assigned to 2 experimental groups: performing 6 weeks of squat exercise training under normobaric hypoxia (H, FiO2 = 15%) or normoxia (N). In both groups, subjects performed 3 weekly sessions (a total of 18 sessions) of 3 sets of back squat at 10-repetition maximum with 2 minutes of rest between sets. Dynamic, isometric, and isokinetic leg strength and body composition were measured under normoxia before and after resistance training. Squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM) improved significantly (p ≤ 0.05) after resistance training in both H and N groups (88.9 ± 16.9 to 109.4 ± 17.0 kg and 90.0 ± 12.2 to 105.6 ± 13.3 kg, respectively). However, there were no changes in maximal isometric and isokinetic leg strength, lean body mass, and fat mass after the resistance training in both groups. In addition, no significant differences were observed between H and N groups in squat 1RM, maximal isometric and isokinetic leg strength, and body composition. The major findings of this study suggest that short-term resistance training performed under normobaric hypoxia has no additive beneficial effect on muscular performance and body composition. In practical terms, our data suggest that the use of systemic hypoxia during short-term resistance training is not a viable method to further enhance muscular performance and body composition in previously resistance-untrained men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)935-941
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Resistance Training
Body Composition
Leg
Aleurites
Hypoxia
Fats
Exercise

Keywords

  • Intermittent hypoxic training
  • Lean body mass
  • Maximal strength
  • Weight training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Combining normobaric hypoxia with short-term resistance training has no additive beneficial effect on muscular performance and body composition. / Ho, Jen-Yu; Kuo, Tai Yu; Liu, Kuan Lin; Dong, Xiang Yi; Tung, Kang.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 935-941.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Ho, J-Y, Kuo, T-Y, Liu, K-L, Dong, X-Y, and Tung, K. Combining normobaric hypoxia with short-term resistance training has no additive beneficial effect on muscular performance and body composition. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 935-941, 2014- The aim of this study was to determine the effects of shortterm resistance training combined with systemic hypoxia on muscular performance and body composition. Eighteen resistance-untrained men (21.3 ± 2.0 years, 172.7 ± 5.5 cm, 67.3 ± 9.7 kg) were matched and assigned to 2 experimental groups: performing 6 weeks of squat exercise training under normobaric hypoxia (H, FiO2 = 15{\%}) or normoxia (N). In both groups, subjects performed 3 weekly sessions (a total of 18 sessions) of 3 sets of back squat at 10-repetition maximum with 2 minutes of rest between sets. Dynamic, isometric, and isokinetic leg strength and body composition were measured under normoxia before and after resistance training. Squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM) improved significantly (p ≤ 0.05) after resistance training in both H and N groups (88.9 ± 16.9 to 109.4 ± 17.0 kg and 90.0 ± 12.2 to 105.6 ± 13.3 kg, respectively). However, there were no changes in maximal isometric and isokinetic leg strength, lean body mass, and fat mass after the resistance training in both groups. In addition, no significant differences were observed between H and N groups in squat 1RM, maximal isometric and isokinetic leg strength, and body composition. The major findings of this study suggest that short-term resistance training performed under normobaric hypoxia has no additive beneficial effect on muscular performance and body composition. In practical terms, our data suggest that the use of systemic hypoxia during short-term resistance training is not a viable method to further enhance muscular performance and body composition in previously resistance-untrained men.",
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