Clinical simulation teaching program to promote the effectiveness of nurses in coping with workplace violence

Jin Lain Ming, Li Hua Tseng, Hui Mei Huang, Shiao Pei Hong, Ching I. Chang, Chen Yin Tung*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Workplace violence is a phenomenon that is prevalent around the world. Nursing personnel are one of the most frequent victims of workplace attacks. Beyond the harm done to physical health, mental health, and workplace morale, workplace violence also leads to the loss of personnel and causes severe injury to institutions and nursing professionals. Purpose: The aim of this study is to improve the awareness, attitudes, and self-confidence of nurses with regard to workplace violence using clinical simulation teaching and training courses. Methods: A total of 400 clinical nurses at a tertiary hospital in Taipei City were enrolled and randomly assigned into either the experimental group, which received the education intervention, or the control group, which received no intervention. A total of 392 enrolled participants completed the study, including 200 in the experimental group and 192 in the control group. Before and after the intervention, a structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which were analyzed using a GEE model with SPSS V.23. Results: After the clinical simulation teaching course, awareness of workplace violence as well as related attitudes and self-confidence were higher in the experimental group than the control group. Moreover, the posttest scores and pretest-posttest differences in scores were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (p <.001). Advanced analysis of the data showed that cognition scores, being older in age, and having a registered nurse grade of N3 were all associated with earning a higher score. In addition, in terms of attitude, registered nurse grade was found to correlate positively with score. Further, male participants earned higher self-confidence scores than their female colleagues and participants who worked in either the emergency or psychiatric departments earned higher scores. Conclusions: The “Workplace Violence Clinical Simulation Teaching and Training Course” was shown to improve the awareness, attitudes, and self-confidence of clinical nurses with regard to workplace violence and may thus help reduce the risk and harm of violence in this category. In the future, contextual teaching courses on workplace violence prevention should be developed for different nursing levels, divisions, and units based on their specific characteristics and needs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-71
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Nursing
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jun

Keywords

  • Nursing
  • Simulation teaching
  • Workplace violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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