Changes in plasma C1q, apelin and adropin concentrations in older adults after descending and ascending stair walking intervention

Trevor C. Chen*, Tsang Hai Huang, Wei Chin Tseng, Kuo Wei Tseng, Chung Chan Hsieh, Mei Yen Chen, Tai Ying Chou, Yuh Chuan Huang, Hsin Lian Chen, Kazunori Nosaka

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared changes in plasma complement component 1q (C1q), apelin and adropin concentrations in older obese women after descending (DSW) and ascending stair walking (ASW) training (n = 15/group) performed twice a week for 12 weeks, with gradual increases in exercise time from 5 to 60 min. Fasting blood samples were collected 3 days before the first and 4 days after the last training session. The improvements in the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength of the knee extensors, functional physical fitness [e.g., 30-s chair stand (CS) performance], resting systolic blood pressure (SBP), insulin sensitivity [e.g., oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)] and blood lipid profiles [e.g., total cholesterol (TC)] were greater (p < 0.05) in the DSW than ASW group. Plasma C1q decreased (− 51 ± 30%), and apelin (23 ± 15%) and adropin (127 ± 106%) increased (p ≤.0.05) only after DSW. Significant (p ≤ 0.01) partial correlations were found between the pre- to post-DSW changes in C1q, apelin or adropin and changes in outcome measures [e.g., C1q and MVIC (r = − 0.837), apelin and SBP (r = − 0.854), and andropin and OGTT (r = − 0.729)]. These results showed that greater decreases in plasma C1q and greater increases in apelin and adropin concentrations were associated with greater improvements in outcome measures after DSW than after ASW.

Original languageEnglish
Article number17644
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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