Ca++ influx is essential for the hypotensive response to arginine vasopressin-induced neuron activation of the area postrema in the rat

Shu Ju Yang, Ji-Chuu Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We attempted to relate the signal pathway to the hypotension induced by arginine vasopressin (AVP) injection into the area postrema (AP) in urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats with vagotomy. A femoral artery and vein were catheterized to measure the blood pressure (BP) and administer drugs, respectively. The rat was placed on a stereotaxic apparatus to expose the calamus sriptorius (CS) by craniostomy and maintained at normocapnia in hyperoxia. In protocol 1, hypotension evoked by AVP (3.0 × 10- 5 IU) microinjected into the AP 0.2 mm rostral to the CS of the midline was abolished by V1A antagonist, U73122 (phospholipase C blocker), and BAPTA-AM (Ca++ chelator), suggesting that an increasing intracellular Ca++ is essential for AVP-induced hypotension. In protocol 2, AVP-induced hypotension was abolished by EGTA (extracellular Ca++ chelator) and Ca++ blockers such as nifedipine, nimodipine (L-types), and omega-conotoxin MVIIC (P/Q-type), but not by omega-conotoxin GVIA (N-type). In protocol 3, AVP-induced hypotension was blocked by calphostin C (protein kinase C inhibitor) and mimicked by an increase in intracellular K+ ions that was reversed by EGTA. Vehicle injections produced no changes in BP. In protocol 4, glutamate-induced hypotension was reversed by BAPTA-AM but not by EGTA or V1A antagonist. Our data suggest that AVP-induced hypotension depends on Ca++ influx through a signal pathway from phospholipase C to protein kinase C which inactivates K+ channels that may depolarize AP neurons to activate L- and P/Q-type Ca++ channels. This may provide new insights into establishing a relationship between the signal pathway and physiological functions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-71
Number of pages16
JournalBrain Research
Volume1163
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Aug 13

Fingerprint

Controlled Hypotension
Area Postrema
Arginine Vasopressin
Neurons
Calamus
Egtazic Acid
Signal Transduction
Type C Phospholipases
Chelating Agents
Protein Kinase C
omega-Conotoxin GVIA
Blood Pressure
Nimodipine
Hyperoxia
Injections
Femoral Vein
Protein C Inhibitor
Vagotomy
Urethane
Femoral Artery

Keywords

  • Arginine vasopressin
  • Ca channel
  • Hypotension
  • Phospholipase C
  • Protein kinase C
  • Rat
  • V receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Ca++ influx is essential for the hypotensive response to arginine vasopressin-induced neuron activation of the area postrema in the rat. / Yang, Shu Ju; Hwang, Ji-Chuu.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1163, No. 1, 13.08.2007, p. 56-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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