Caffeine's effect on intermittent sprint cycling performance with different rest intervals

Chia Lun Lee, Ching-Feng Cheng, Jung Charng Lin, Hsin Wei Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine ingestion on the performance of an intermittent sprint cycling test (ISCT) with different rest intervals. Fourteen males with team sport experience consumed 6 mg kg-1 of caffeine or a placebo 60 min prior to completing two sets of an ISCT with 4-min rest intervals. Each set consisted of 12 × 4-s sprints with 20-or 90-sactive recovery intervals at 60-70 rpm. Blood lactate was collected at baseline and immediately following the completion of six sprints in each set. At 20-s recovery intervals, peak power and total work were not significantly different between conditions during the ISCT (P>0.05); but caffeine reduced 6.31% effort for mean power in Sprint 10 of the later stage, as well as an increased fatigue index and elevated blood lactate levels during the ISCT (P<0.05). At 90-s recovery intervals, peak power, mean power, and total work under caffeine conditions were significantly higher than under placebo conditions during the ISCT (P<0.05), but no differences were apparent in fatigue index and blood lactate levels (P>0.05). In conclusion, caffeine ingestion may be ergolytic, affecting performance and fatigue development in the later stage during a prolonged and intermittent sprint test with a short recovery interval. However, caffeine produces an ergogenic effect in the initial stage of an intermittent sprint performance with alonger recovery interval.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2107-2116
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume112
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jun 1

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Caffeine
Fatigue
Lactic Acid
Performance-Enhancing Substances
Eating
Sports
Placebos

Keywords

  • Anaerobic capacity
  • Blood lactate
  • Ergogenic aid
  • Recovery time
  • Repeated sprints

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Caffeine's effect on intermittent sprint cycling performance with different rest intervals. / Lee, Chia Lun; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lin, Jung Charng; Huang, Hsin Wei.

In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 112, No. 6, 01.06.2012, p. 2107-2116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Chia Lun ; Cheng, Ching-Feng ; Lin, Jung Charng ; Huang, Hsin Wei. / Caffeine's effect on intermittent sprint cycling performance with different rest intervals. In: European Journal of Applied Physiology. 2012 ; Vol. 112, No. 6. pp. 2107-2116.
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