Affective responses during high-intensity interval exercise compared with moderate-intensity continuous exercise in inactive women

I. Hua Chu*, Pei Tzu Wu, Wen Lan Wu, Hsiang Chi Yu, Tzu Cheng Yu, Yu Kai Chang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the effects of an acute bout of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE) on affective responses in inactive women. Thirty women with normal body mass index (BMI) and 30 women with BMI ≥ 24 kg/m2 participated in the study. All participants completed a graded exercise test and performed two exercise sessions (HIIE and MICE) in random order. Affective responses were assessed during and after each exercise session, using the rating of perceived exertion (RPE), Self-Assessment-Manikin (SAM), and Subjective Exercise Experience Scale (SEES). The results showed that the RPE scores were significantly higher in HIIE than in MICE. HIIE resulted in significantly lower pleasure scores using the SAM while arousal and dominance scores were significantly higher with HIIE compared to MICE. Positive well-being scores using the SEES were significantly lower with HIIE and both psychological distress and fatigue scores were significantly higher with HIIE. The results showed that affective responses with MICE were more positive than with HIIE, but no differences were found between normal and overweight/obese women. Based on these results, MICE may be a more acceptable exercise program for inactive women regardless of their weight status.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5393
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 May 2

Keywords

  • Affect
  • High-intensity interval exercise
  • Inactive women
  • Psychological responses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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