Adolescent Use of Dating Applications and the Associations with Online Victimization and Psychological Distress

Tzu Fu Huang, Chun Yin Hou, Fong Ching Chang*, Chiung Hui Chiu, Ping Hung Chen, Jeng Tung Chiang, Nae Fang Miao, Hung Yi Chuang, Yen Jung Chang, Hsi Chang, Hsueh Chih Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this study, we examined the relationships between the use of online dating applications (apps), online victimization, and psychosocial distress among adolescents. This study was conducted in 2020. A sample of 2595 seventh-grade students from 30 Taiwanese middle schools was surveyed. We conducted a self-administered survey. Overall, 15% of the adolescents reported using online dating apps in the past year, while 78% reported having seen dating app advertisements on the internet in the past year. Multivariate analysis results indicated that adolescents’ exposure to the marketing of dating apps and poor academic performance were both associated with the use of online dating apps. Adolescents who used dating apps were more likely to experience online privacy victimization, cyberbullying victimization, and online sexual harassment. The use of dating apps by adolescents, online privacy victimization, cyberbullying victimization, and online sexual harassment were associated with higher levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. In conclusion, adolescent use of dating apps is related to online victimization and psychological distress.

Original languageEnglish
Article number903
JournalBehavioral Sciences
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Nov

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • dating applications
  • online victimization
  • psychological distress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Development
  • Genetics
  • General Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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