Acute effects of static active or dynamic active stretching on eccentric-exercise-induced hamstring muscle damage

Che Hsiu Chen, Trevor C. Chen, Mei Hwa Jan, Jiu Jenq Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine whether an acute bout of active or dynamic hamstring-stretching exercises would reduce the amount of muscle damage observed after a strenuous eccentric task and to determine whether the stretching protocols elicit similar responses. Design: A randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods: Thirty-six young male students performed 5 min of jogging as a warm-up and were allocated to 1 of 3 groups: 3 min of static active stretching (SAS), 3 min of dynamic active stretching (DAS), or control (CON). All subjects performed eccentric exercise immediately after stretching. Heart rate, core temperature, maximal voluntary isometric contraction, passive hip flexion, passive hamstring stiffness (PHS), plasma creatine kinase activity, and myoglobin were recorded at prestretching, at poststretching, and every day after the eccentric exercises for 5 d. Results: After stretching, the change in hip flexion was significantly higher in the SAS (5° ) and DAS (10.8° ) groups than in the CON (-4.1° ) group. The change in PHS was significantly higher in the DAS (5.6%) group than in the CON (-5.7%) and SAS (-6.7%) groups. Furthermore, changes in muscle-damage markers were smaller in the SAS group than in the DAS and CON groups. Conclusions: Prior active stretching could be useful for attenuating the symptoms of muscle damage after eccentric exercise. SAS is recommended over DAS as a stretching protocol in terms of strength, hamstring range of motion, and damage markers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)346-352
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Muscle Stretching Exercises
Exercise
Hamstring Muscles
Muscles
Control Groups
Hip
Jogging

Keywords

  • Muscle flexibility
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Strength

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Acute effects of static active or dynamic active stretching on eccentric-exercise-induced hamstring muscle damage. / Chen, Che Hsiu; Chen, Trevor C.; Jan, Mei Hwa; Lin, Jiu Jenq.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 346-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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