Active balancing reflexes for small humanoid robots

Sara McGrath, Hansjoerg (Jacky) Baltes, John E. Anderson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes three balancing-reflex algorithms (threshold control, PID control, and hybrid control) that were implemented on a real 8 DOF small humanoid robot equipped with a two-axis accelerometer sensor. We term our approach a model-free approach, since it does not require a mathematical model of the underlying robot. Instead the controller attempts to recreate successful previous motions (so-called baseline motions). In our extensive tests, the basic threshold algorithm proves the most effective overall. All algorithms are able to balance for simple tasks, but as the balancing required becomes more complex (ie, controlling multiple joints over uneven terrain), the need for more sophisticated algorithms becomes apparent.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC
Edition1 PART 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Dec 1
Event17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 2008 Jul 62008 Jul 11

Publication series

NameIFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline)
Number1 PART 1
Volume17
ISSN (Print)1474-6670

Other

Other17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period08/7/608/7/11

Fingerprint

Robots
Three term control systems
Accelerometers
Mathematical models
Controllers
Sensors

Keywords

  • Intelligent robotics
  • Mobile robots
  • Perception and sensing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

McGrath, S., Baltes, H. J., & Anderson, J. E. (2008). Active balancing reflexes for small humanoid robots. In Proceedings of the 17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC (1 PART 1 ed.). (IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline); Vol. 17, No. 1 PART 1). https://doi.org/10.3182/20080706-5-KR-1001.2687

Active balancing reflexes for small humanoid robots. / McGrath, Sara; Baltes, Hansjoerg (Jacky); Anderson, John E.

Proceedings of the 17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC. 1 PART 1. ed. 2008. (IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline); Vol. 17, No. 1 PART 1).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

McGrath, S, Baltes, HJ & Anderson, JE 2008, Active balancing reflexes for small humanoid robots. in Proceedings of the 17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC. 1 PART 1 edn, IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline), no. 1 PART 1, vol. 17, 17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 08/7/6. https://doi.org/10.3182/20080706-5-KR-1001.2687
McGrath S, Baltes HJ, Anderson JE. Active balancing reflexes for small humanoid robots. In Proceedings of the 17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC. 1 PART 1 ed. 2008. (IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline); 1 PART 1). https://doi.org/10.3182/20080706-5-KR-1001.2687
McGrath, Sara ; Baltes, Hansjoerg (Jacky) ; Anderson, John E. / Active balancing reflexes for small humanoid robots. Proceedings of the 17th World Congress, International Federation of Automatic Control, IFAC. 1 PART 1. ed. 2008. (IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline); 1 PART 1).
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