A pilot study on the association between the blood oxygen level-dependent signal in the reward system and dopamine transporter availability in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Shih Hsien Lin, Mei Hung Chi, I. Hui Lee, Kao Chin Chen, Ying Chun Tai, Wei Jen Yao, Nan Tsing Chiu, Dong Yu Yang, Chun Yu Lin, Po See Chen, Yen Kuang Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background.It is well-known that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with changes in the dopaminergic system. However, the relationship between central dopaminergic tone and the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during receipt of rewards and penalties in the corticostriatal pathway in adults with ADHD is unclear.Methods.Single-photon emission computed tomography with [99mTC]TRODAT-1 was used to assess striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted on subjects performing the Iowa Gambling Test.Result.DAT availability was found to be associated with the BOLD response, which was a covariate of monetary loss, in the medial prefrontal cortex (r = 0.55, P =.03), right ventral striatum (r = 0.69, P =.003), and right orbital frontal cortex (r = 0.53, P =.03) in adults with ADHD. However, a similar correlation was not found in the controls.Conclusions.The results confirmed that dopaminergic tone may play a different role in the penalty-elicited response of adults with ADHD. It is plausible that a lower neuro-threshold accompanied by insensitivity to punishment could be exacerbated by the hypodopaminergic tone in ADHD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCNS Spectrums
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • dopamine
  • fMRI
  • Iowa Gambling Test
  • Key words:
  • reward system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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